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iPhone Evolution: The History of Emojis

The iPhone evolution has happened before our very eyes. It seems like just yesterday that everyone went crazy about the very first release of the iPhone 1, simply known as the iPhone. With a glistening touch screen and virtually limitless capabilities, we thought this model couldn’t get any better. And then it did – again and again for the next twelve years, with new upgrades and updates with each new version. With the release of this incredible product came the increase of use and awareness for emojis. But, did you know that emojis were actually created 8 years before the first iPhone even released? In this informational analysis, we rediscover the history of emojis and how our undying love for creative emoticons first began.

A Bit About Emoji History

The emoji got its start before the evolution of iPhone could make its way into our digital world. Sources find that emojis were first used by the Japanese in their cellular technologies in 1999, and were further adapted and updated by the US market thereafter. But, it wasn’t until Apple’s phone system upgrade IOS6 that emoji took the US by storm. Since then, we’ve utilized and embraced the emoji as a way to translate our feelings and words into cute, funny, easily-shareable images.

iPhone Evolution History of Emoji
Source: https://emojipedia.org/apple/

The Beginning of the Emoji

If you’re an older millennial, a part of generation X, or a baby boomer, you may remember the time before the iPhone evolution took place. And, a time even before cellular devices in general. But, still, a time in which we utilized the internet for various reasons, including meeting and talking with strangers via chat rooms. Even back then we used :), :D, and 😉 to communicate our feelings visually. These were the most rudimentary and initial stages of the emoticon. If you were communicating using these back in the day, you know how important they were for conveying emotion.

The Very First Emoji

Seeing a need for this ability to showcase emotions through imagery in cellular technology, a Japanese artist by the name of Shigetaka Kurita created the very first emoji for a cellular software system. And, he went on to create single images for 175 others that are now considered a permanent art collection at New York’s Museum of Modern Art.

The Connection Between the History of Emojis and the iPhone Evolution

Years after the very first emoji created, the Apple team saw the opportunity to expand the impact of emojis and a way to implement them into their new software design. But first, they needed backing by the Unicode Consortium. This is basically a global organization that implements standards of text across computer technologies. Essentially, this group creates code for each textual concept that can be utilized across computer platforms and software to adopt the same images so they are the same throughout all computerized devices.

Once this nonprofit saw the need for the expansion of emoji use, Apple’s release of the IOS6 in 2007 allowed all users to gain access to emojis on their smartphone devices. Then, in 2009, the Unicode Consortium approved 625 more emojis to the global emoji keyboard. Finally, in 2010, the organization recognized the ever-growing use and popularity of the emoticon keyboard. This made them globally recognizable across all computer keyboard and cellular device technologies.

Getting More from Your iPhone

If you’ve witnessed the evolution of both the iPhone and the emoticon keyboard, you know the impact of cellular technology, even in today’s business world. So, if you have an iPhone, you may wonder how you can better utilize your phone to implement your business tactics. At Global Call Forwarding, we give iPhone users a better edge by offering virtual phone numbers that work to link to iPhone devices. This means that you don’t have to get a business landline or another business cell phone just to take your business calls! You can do all of your business from your iPhone using our local or toll free virtual phone numbers. This will allow for all the advanced features you need to run a successful business. To learn more about getting a virtual phone number on your iPhone, contact us today.

The History of Mobile Phones

The History of Mobile Phones

Mobile phone technology has progressed significantly since ‘cell phones’ were first invented. The first modern portable handset was invented by Dr. Martin Cooper in 1973. Motorola sought to build a personal telephone that belonged to an individual rather than a home or a desk.

 

hands raising cellphones

1973 – 1980s – 1G

Dr. Cooper was an engineer and general manager at Motorola at the time he invented the cell phone. The prototype developed by Dr. Cooper weighed almost two and a half pounds and was larger than today’s office phones. In 1973, he placed the first call from a portable phone – to a rival engineer at Bell Labs.

After Dr. Cooper’s revolutionary creation, it took nearly ten years for mobile phones to reach the market. Motorola rolled out the first commercial mobile phone in 1983, the DynaTAC 8000X, costing $3,995. The cost of Motorola’s first phone today would be $9600 after accounting for inflation! Mobile phone technology was relatively underdeveloped at the time, operating on an analogue cellular network.

1990s – Digital Cellular

Consistent with the rapid technological advancements of the 1990s, cellular phone technology improved exponentially. In the 1990s, a 2nd generation of mobile phone systems was created. Two systems vied for global supremacy: the U.S. developed CDMA standard and the European developed GSM standard.

Along with the new ways of transmitting information, cellular phone technology was advancing. Smaller batteries and improved energy-efficiency devices enabled companies to create smaller cell phones. While the brick-sized Motorola DynaTAC 8000 weighed 28 ounces, newer phones in the 90s weighed between 3.5 and 7 ounces.

The 2nd generation of phone systems introduced text messaging and the ability to access web content from mobile phones. Custom ringtones were incredibly popular among mobile phone users. Of course, SMS/text messaging has been a huge success. ‘Texting’ is the preferred medium for communications among millennials. In addition, four out of five people use texting for business communications.

Nokia was a leader in the mobile phone industry during the 1990s. Nokia launched an early mobile phone with vibrations, and later introduced ‘Snake’ to cell phone users.

The first full internet service on a cell phone was introduced in 1999. However, this internet access was different from accessing the mobile internet.

2000s – 3G/4G

During the 1990s, cell phone use started to become commonplace and the demand for cellular data increased. More people sought access to the internet from their mobile phones and people sought faster data speeds.

Engineers in the industry began developing ‘Mobile Broadband’ to satisfy mobile phone users. 2G technology utilized circuit switching for data transmission. The major change from 2G to 3G was the use of packet switching to replace circuit switching. It wasn’t until 3G technologies that mobile phone users could access the mobile internet.

In 2007, Apple rolled out the first iPhone in the United States. The iPhone was a revolutionary device with full internet access, a touch screen and all the functions of a traditional camera phone and mp3 player. Apple has continued to make improvements to the iPhone and there are now more than 100 million iPhone in the United States.

By 2009, engineers began developing a 4th generation of technology to accommodate bandwidth consuming applications like streaming media. The 4th generation is called Native IP Networks.

Cell Phones Today

Like most electronics, improvements in mobile phone technology came about exponentially. Today’s cell phones have capabilities that are likely beyond the imagination of Dr. Martin Cooper. There are almost as many cell-phone subscriptions as there are people on this earth. The advancement of mobile phone technology is bound to continue in future years. What innovations would you most like to see in coming years?